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Topic: WiMAX on OpenWRT – sure!

The content of this topic has been archived on 24 Apr 2018. There are no obvious gaps in this topic, but there may still be some posts missing at the end.

Just a small sunbeam from the dark north.

We have used OpenWRT as a base for making a WiMAX Base Station – successfully. The BS is based on an Alix-board from PCengines, running x86 Kamikaze with a “RT-tweaked kernel†. Currently we are running live tests in Norway with multiple CPE’s connected. Next is to make a CPE – also running OpenWRT.

Huge thanks to everybody for making the OpenWRT a reality – I’ll make sure we contribute/donate back!

TTrondsen
WITELCOM AS
Norway

Just curious, what wimax radio are you using?  What kind of range and speeds?  Sounds like a fun project.

Hello, boss, hehe!

We use the Wavesat 3.5GHz mPCI for the BTS right now, but we will also tend to the 5GHz pretty soon. The test network currently has moderate distances – 2-3 km, but then again the signal levels correspond to this. Hopefully we will get some at 4-5 km later soon, and I’ll report some data if people are interested.

We see speeds very close to the 5bits/sec/HZ (for 64-QUAM) as defined by the standard. This is around the double of WiFi on the same spectrum mask.

Like you say - good fun now, but a lot of work on too few people the previous half year…

/TTrondsen

And Kun – get back to work smile

(Last edited by ttrondsen on 9 Jan 2008, 16:20)

@ttrondsen
Congrats !
Would be interested testing this here as well, to replace WiFi based long distance links (7-9 km). We get two 8 Mbps adsl subscriptions simultaniously through those but that is about the max.
The Asus Wl-500gp unit also has an mPCI slot. Would that be an option in combination with the Wavesat card ? We are looking here for low cost / high performance solutions and preferably it should work in the 5 GHz ISM band.

hi there friends from the north!  i too work with WiMax hardware, however we have moved from BS-SS setup to a mesh setup (also at 4.6 and 5.8Ghz).  Just curious, what version of quam 64 are you using?  have you set up multiple subscribers?  cool to talk to someone else in the field!

>doddel

I'm sure the Asus may work for the CPE mPCI, but the BS mPCI definitely not - it needs a whopping 8-9 W or more on the mPCI bus. Not many boards provide that. If you have an operation going in Portugal (I use to go there surfing!!!), we'll put it on the list of "places to go next".

>stuckinNJ

The modulation is IAW the standard - you have a .pdf from Wavesat (Reference Design) -IEEE 802.16-2004 OFDM PHY. We've deployed multiple SS - adding more every week. We definitely would be interested to talk with others - drop me an e-mail, will you?

>ttrondsen
thanks for the info; am a bit puzzled about this BS vs CPE power issue as the Wavetek website states that the DM256 chip can do BS and CPE role, just as the Broadcom chips we are used to in WiFi. Given the 17dBm output power it cannot be the RF causing the trouble. Where do the extra 5 Watts go ?
Hope you'll contribute an OpenWrt package that adds to OpenWrt whatever it takes to control the BS and CPE WiMAX interface.
When coming to Portugal drop me a line !

The DM256 is really "steam-engine" technology - very conservative yield with corresponding power consumption in combination with typically 100% duty-cycle for the BS. All this equals a lot of power and high temperature. The DM256 mPCI may run both BS and SS, but is way to expensive for the latter usage. The NP7256 is cheaper, but SS-mode only.

>ttrondsen

Yep, You're right, but most 'steam' generated by fpga and rf-magic RF part - for 3.5GHz mPCI, latest need 7W though, if your use 9W - you probably use some early hw. revision.
Do you run NP7256 also on ALIX?

ttrondsen wrote:

We use the Wavesat 3.5GHz mPCI for the BTS right now, but we will also tend to the 5GHz pretty soon. The test network currently has moderate distances – 2-3 km, but then again the signal levels correspond to this. Hopefully we will get some at 4-5 km later soon, and I’ll report some data if people are interested.

We see speeds very close to the 5bits/sec/HZ (for 64-QUAM) as defined by the standard. This is around the double of WiFi on the same spectrum mask.

Like you say - good fun now, but a lot of work on too few people the previous half year…

/TTrondsen

And Kun – get back to work smile

Hi,
i would like to know where download drivers for Wavesat NP7256 and DM256; very thanks in advance

Try contact Wavesat. Their drivers are by no means open-source though.

We, @ AWMN have links up to 16+km using plain cm9 and 80cm dish running @ 24+mbit.  have a look here. Our policy is to never use RF power above 5mW in order to keep the band as clean as possible.

here is how a typical node looks like.  this one runs openwrt/madwifi on alix & rb532a and cm9 atheros 802.11a hardware.

(Last edited by acoul on 11 Apr 2008, 07:40)

acoul wrote:

We, @ AWMN have links up to 16+km using plain cm9 and 80cm dish running @ 24+mbit.  have a look here. Our policy is to never use RF power above 5mW in order to keep the band as clean as possible.

here is how a typical node looks like.  this one runs openwrt/madwifi on alix & rb532a and cm9 atheros 802.11a hardware.

And that is WiMAX...?  ;-)

Evert wrote:

And that is WiMAX...?  ;-)

atheros cm9 802.11a 5.5 - 5.8GHz

Yup, and WiMAX is the 802.16 standard, so me thinks your posting is not WiMAX-related, and thus not belongs in this thread... 8-)

That is Wi-Fi. They are talking about WiMax, that's IEEE 802.16. It is a completely different technology http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WiMAX

Ooops, sorry Evert, we've posted at the same time ;-)

(Last edited by madwolf on 13 Apr 2008, 22:12)

Quoting from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WiMAX

A commonly-held misconception is that WiMAX will deliver 70 Mbit/s over 50 kilometers. In reality, WiMAX can do one or the other — operating over maximum range (50 km) increases bit error rate and thus must use a lower bitrate. Lowering the range allows a device to operate at higher bitrates.
...
In practice, this means that in a line-of-sight environment with a portable Mobile WiMAX CPE, speeds of 10 Mbit/s at 10 km could be delivered.

why do you want to do WiMax when you can do the same thing with 802.11a (referring to the 5GHz band).  a friendly argument?

Google is nice:
http://blog.tomevslin.com/2008/02/wimax-vs-wifi.html

(Last edited by acoul on 14 Apr 2008, 09:34)

acoul wrote:

Quoting from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WiMAX

A commonly-held misconception is that WiMAX will deliver 70 Mbit/s over 50 kilometers. In reality, WiMAX can do one or the other — operating over maximum range (50 km) increases bit error rate and thus must use a lower bitrate. Lowering the range allows a device to operate at higher bitrates.
...
In practice, this means that in a line-of-sight environment with a portable Mobile WiMAX CPE, speeds of 10 Mbit/s at 10 km could be delivered.

why do you want to do WiMax when you can do the same thing with 802.11a (referring to the 5GHz band).  a friendly argument?

Google is nice:
http://blog.tomevslin.com/2008/02/wimax-vs-wifi.html

802.16d and 802.16e are two among many others in wimax standard. 802.16d is fixed and it works like 802.11a but non line of sight. 802.11e is for mobile and has future.

Hello All Dears.

I need OpenWRT WiMax Supported for Wavesat Chip.

I can`t see links sake download.

Please send me with email address, links for download . (hamid.moghaddam@yahoo.com)

Thanks.
Bestregards.

Hello

I don't think that such OpenWRT software can exist. OpenWRT is opensource and Wavesat driver is proprietary software.
There is also need real time kernel.
I believe the only way to make work a Wavesat chips is a buy a CPE or Base station based on it.

//batcilla

Hello Dear batcilla.

you have WiMax Wavesat Driver ?

first i need Wavesat Driver for Linux.

can you help me ?

thanks
Hamid Moghaddam

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